Gallery Jones News
1 October 2016 - 16:06, by , in Artists Press, Gallery Jones News, Comments off

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ARTIST: James Nizam
TITLE: Ascensions of Time
DATES: September 8th to October 22nd, 2016
LOCATION: 108 East Broadway
TYPE: Photography and site-specific installation

Ascensions of Time explores our relationships with architecture, illumination, and time in ways that are at once physical and metaphorical. The exhibit is domiciled in a familiar armature of walls, floors, and portals: the specific space of an art gallery. We discover how light can bring architecture into being, defining its interior and exterior. Light draws out days and spaces for us. All the works gathered here speak to time as we perceive it and as it is measured out celestially. They deploy a spectrum of photographic technologies both old and new that encourage us to think through the paradox that architecture can be an extended photograph made by light in a room, or that photographs can be sculptural rather than flat images mounted on a wall. Each work functions as a station for our contemplation of how light in and on architecture also tracks time, not in the well-known sense of a building’s decay or the unfolding of styles, but because architecture is an apparatus that expands photography both spatially and temporally. Nizam asks how architecture embodies time, what architectural time is and feels like.

Sunpath (September Equinox) traces the arc the sun’s light would draw in the gallery on September 22nd, 2016. Nizam’s thinking for this exhibit began with this work and it is the first we see. While there are many paths through this exhibit, we necessarily begin here and move through the layers of a spatial model presented throughout the gallery. Formatted diagrammatically in BluePrint, on the floor Sunpath (September Equinox) is the largest piece in its dimensions and implications. Nizam’s use of light- and angle-dependent reflective glass nanospheres for this tapering crescent ensures that, from some angles, this line is invisible. Like us, it is completely reliant on light. It probes what we can see or know. Solargraph (View From Studio) is closely related but reversed: it describes how light makes architecture through time, outside instead of inside and apart from this exhibit. Nizam used time lapse photography to show not only the changing arc of the sun’s light from the start of the summer equinox until the exhibit’s opening but also to transform these accumulating lines into forms that we can construe as the facades of solid architecture. Yet these buildings across from the artist’s studio are made only of light.

In From Sunrise and To Sunset, we witness how architecture captures light and how an image that records this six-hour path can help us to see the very medium that supports our sight the first place. We might say the same about galleries and indeed art: we need both to help us see. Crucially for Nizam, these works are silently performative; he stayed in the room for the duration of the exposure. Abstracting individual vectors from the continuous registration of light on a wall and floor that make up the final shape he recorded in Frieze, Nizam plotted Moulding as a projection and reification of these lines. A play on an architectural framing element and on the notion of shaping form, Moulding pauses the durational process of defining shape and form via light. It is solid in the gallery, but its dimensions are taken from the evanescent articulations of beams of light in rooms as these define the relief of a moulding, for example. Mouldings become shadow machines.

Thoroughly but never didactically, Nizam scrutinizes dimensions of our telluric existence in terms of the physical, perceptual, and technological interiority that defines us. While he does not show people, his work is intimately concerned with our ways in the world, with the spaces and temporalities that we inhabit. His use of the camera obscura in Negative Relief and Positive Ground underlines the deep-seated link between image making and our sense of inverting figure and ground. The philosopher John Locke described the mind as the “dark room” of the understanding, a “closet, wholly shut from light, with only some little openings left, to let in external visible resemblances….” Nizam makes this observation contemporary in Negative Relief, which repurposes closet doors as a screen. As furniture, it divides the room. It also presents an image screen, a receptive surface for a neighbourhood scene captured by a camera obscura and printed in the characteristically inverted format on this piece of portable, domestic architecture. Nizam memorably calls this form a ‘sculptural Polaroid,’ upsetting art categories by intimating its everyday qualities, its dimensionality, yet also its evanescence. Positive Ground is the child of Negative Relief: while a screen must have positive and negative relief to stand up, ‘negative’ here also refers to the photographic negative of the camera obscura image that Nizam affixed to the zig-zag surface. Using negative film to photograph this screen, he creates a positive that is nonetheless anything but a copy or replica. It is a version, a relative. To suggest its difference, Positive Ground is framed and wall mounted.

It is unusual and highly satisfying to encounter a suite of works that evolve so directly from elemental ideas and relationships. Ascensions of Time would be complete in its exploration of light, time, and architecture had Nizam presented Sunpath (September Equinox) alone. Yet the ramifications added by each of the other works in the exhibit contribute layers of complexity and engagement for each viewer. We are accustomed to treating architecture as solid, semi-permanent, and dependable. Nizam, however, reveals that buildings are in significant measure made of time and light, evanescent dimensions that we may unconsciously choose to ignore or rationalize into permanence in our everyday lives. He does not work with physical structures for their own sakes: instead, he creates what he calls ‘time buildings’, works that make time visible through architecture and construct ‘buildings’ in and of time. He challenges us to see and trust these constructions of time and light in new ways.

Essay by Mark A. Cheetham

James Nizam is a Canadian artist based in Vancouver. His practice investigates photography within an expanded field of the sculptural and seeks to unveil the possibilities for the photographic image to activate space. He has exhibited in Canada and internationally, most recently at Galerie Clement and Schneider in Bonn, Musée Regional de Rimouski and Dazibao in Quebec, Kunst Im Tunnel in Dusseldorf, The Sharjah Art Museum in the United Arab Emirates, and the Vancouver Art Gallery in Vancouver. He has forthcoming exhibitions at Fotogalerie Wien in Austria, and REITER Galerie in Berlin. Nizam holds a BFA from the University of British Columbia and is represented by Birch Contemporary in Toronto, Reiter Galerie in Leipzig, Berlin, London, and Gallery Jones in Vancouver.

Mark A. Cheetham has published extensively on historiography and art theory, abstract art, and art in Canada. A Guggenheim Fellow, he has also received writing and curatorial awards from the College Art Association of America and the Ontario Association of Art Galleries. His book Landscape into Eco Art: Articulations of Nature since the ‘60s will appear with Penn State UP in 2017. He is a professor of art history at the University of Toronto.

13 May 2016 - 12:57, by , in Artists Press, Gallery Jones News, Comments off

Helen Wong interviews Paul Morstad:

interview_morstad

http://www.sadmag.ca/blog/2016/5/3/interview-paul-morstad

5 February 2016 - 14:59, by , in Artists Press, Gallery Jones News, Comments off

“Ross Penhall’s Vancouver, Surrounding Areas and Places That Inspire”, published by Random House, is now available at the gallery and online.

A collection of 120 paintings by renowned artist Ross Penhall that celebrates the identity and spirit of Vancouver. Also included are paintings of inspirational places across Canada, the US and Europe, including the California Coast, the Prairies and the Italian countryside.

penhall_book

5 February 2016 - 14:38, by , in Artists Press, Gallery Jones News, Comments off

Standing Still: Photographs by Danny Singer is currently on view at the Denver Art Museum in Colorado, USA, until May 22, 2016.

From the press release:

Singer questions that notion of emptiness by revealing subtle, living landscapes of quirky buildings and ordinary people going about their business. Every funny sign, open door, and child on a bicycle has unique significance in the life of the town. Against those backdrops of weather and space, Singer weaves gentle stories about small-town life and the meaning of home.

macnutt23x101
“MacNutt”, archival inkjet print, 23″ x 101″, edition of 5.
3 February 2016 - 17:22, by , in Artists Press, Gallery Jones News, Comments off

The National Gallery of Victoria (NGV), in Melbourne, Australia, recently acquired four works by Canadian artist Danny Singer. NGV is the oldest and most visited gallery in Australia. Founded in 1861, the NGV holds the most significant collection of art in the region; a vast treasury of more than 70,000 works that span thousands of years and a wealth of ideas, disciplines and styles. The Gallery hosts a wide range of international and local artists, exhibitions, programs and events; from contemporary art to major international historic exhibitions, fashion and design, architecture, sound and dance.

delisle43x76_evite
“Delisle”, archival inkjet print, 43″ x 76″, edition of 5.
3 February 2016 - 17:17, by , in Artists Press, Gallery Jones News, Comments off

The November 2015 edition of Vanity Fair’s On Art features Lu Xinjian. Congratulations also to Xinjian for his inclusion in the list of 10 contemporary Chinese artists to watch from Christie’s, full list here.

lu_vf

3 February 2016 - 17:14, by , in Gallery Jones News, Comments off

Last Monday’s national edition of the Globe and Mail featured an article about the changing geographic landscape of Vancouver’s visual arts centre, highlighting our move to the Flats neighbourhood. Read the full article here.

gmarticle

3 February 2016 - 16:57, by , in Exhibitions & Fairs, Gallery Jones News, Comments off

 

Please join us from July 30 – August 2 at the CenturyLink Field Event Center in Seattle, Booth #309, for the inaugural Seattle Art Fair. The fair will feature several of the world’s leading contemporary art galleries, including Gagosian, PACE and Paul Kasmin. Please contact the Gallery at 604.714.2216 if you would like tickets.

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19 December 2015 - 15:43, by , in Artists Press, Gallery Jones News, Comments off

Congratulations to Danny Singer on the addition of four major works of his to the collection of the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne, Australia.  Singer’s visual telling of the realities of human habitation on what historically began as a frontier found an appreciative audience with the curators and Trustees of Australia’s oldest art gallery.

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“Arcola”, archival inkjet print, edition of 5, 43″ x 91″.

 

19 December 2015 - 15:27, by , in Artists Press, Gallery Jones News, Comments off

The Denver Art Museum is mounting a solo exhibition of work by Canadian artist Danny Singer.  Running until May 22, 2016, “Standing Still” features a collection of large format photographic work from Singer’s ongoing exploration of human habitation on the plains and prairies of North America.

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