Exhibitions & Fairs
3 March 2017 - 15:15, by , in Exhibitions & Fairs, Comments off
Opening reception: Saturday, April 1, 2 – 4 p.m.
Exhibition dates: April 1 – 29, 2017
letter_d_wavy_lines_horse_4x6
Mike Bayne, “Three Wavy Lines, D, Horse”, oil on panel, 4″ x 6″.
kerrobert43x72
Danny Singer, “Admiral”, archival inkjet on paper, 23″ x 87″, edition of 7.
3 March 2017 - 14:38, by , in Exhibitions & Fairs, Comments off
Opening reception: Thursday, March 2, 5 – 8 p.m.
Artist Talk: Saturday, March 4, 2:30 p.m.

 

Exhibition dates: March 3 – 29, 2017
Kartoffel-Kafka
“Kartofel Kafka”, watercolour and mixed media on paper, 22 x 30 inches.
Within Paul Morstad’s deftly rendered paintings, you can see the work of a gifted storyteller who can succinctly weave a lucid and compelling narrative.  Much like Claude Debussy’s enigmatic definition of music as “the space between notes”, Morstad also crafts ambiguity into his work that leaves the viewer picking up threads as they wind through the ether of thoughtful substance.
His paintings are dense with allegory, wit, whimsy and absurdity.  Thick with a confluence of ideologies, the works allude to Romanticism, the Age of Enlightenment, and the Industrial Age. He celebrates minds that pushed past the stagnation of the status quo, measured themselves with a new sense of humility, and set us on a course that now strains the capacity of the natural world.
 “Was he an animal, that music could move him so? He felt as if the way to the unknown nourishment he longed for were coming to light”
 – Franz Kafka , The Metamorphosis
Morstad’s “Kartofel Kafka” is a painting of Franz Kafka sitting at a desk intensely typing, while positioned atop a Potato Beetle (Kartofel). All about are opened flying books expelling thick smoke, some of which have come to rest in nesting stacks. As an introduction to the image, Paul recounts a Cold War story of the Soviets accusing the Americans of secretly dropping millions of Colorado potato beetles to wipe out their food supply.
At first glance, the scene seems succinct and charming, but the viewer slowly becomes aware of a brewing pathos seeping through. Kafka’s The Metamorphosis presents the fictional story of Gregor, who wakes up one morning to discover that he has turned into a beetle. This novella is a stew of estrangement and despair. By all accounts, this short story could be autobiographical. Franz Kafka, who suffered from alienation, depression, and anxiety, was one of the great tragic figures of the literary world.
An abridged list of Paul Morstad’s skills and interests reads as follows; Artist, Musician (banjo and fiddle), Animator (he spent ten years working for the National Film Board), an affable conversationalist, a naturalist with an omnivorous interest in zoology, ornithology and biology, an explorer (he has canoed the canals and waterways through Germany to France, and Montreal to New York), an avid reader of literature and an armchair historian.  His art provides a sense of all of that and more.
3 March 2017 - 14:38, by , in Exhibitions & Fairs, Comments off
Opening reception: Saturday, February 4, 2 – 4pm.

 

Exhibition dates: February 4 – 28, 2017.
Gentlemanchine_60x43
“Gentlemanchine”, oil on canvas, 60 x 43 inches.
In 2016 there were two concurrent exhibitions of Peter Aspell’s work, at the Richmond Art Gallery and the West Vancouver Museum.  In the preface to the accompanying catalogue, Rachel Lafo and Darrin Morrison, respectively Directors of those institutions, pointed to the fact that more than 50 years had passed since a serious examination of Aspell’s paintings had taken place in a public institution. There are legions of art collectors, professionals and enthusiasts that saw this as a significant oversight and last year’s exhibitions were a sizeable effort to remedy this.
Peter Aspell had a unique visual language with which he explored the heights and depths of the human condition. He can be simultaneously seen as a visionary portraitist, capturing archetypes with poetic details, a masterful colourist and an archaeologist of imagery.
This exhibition brings together collected work from the Estate that has not been available for sale since Aspell’s passing in 2004.  Curating it has been an exploration of one of Canada’s most dynamic creative minds from the the last century.
3 March 2017 - 14:07, by , in Exhibitions & Fairs, Comments off
COLE MORGAN: SHADOWS
 
Opening reception: Saturday, December 3, 2 – 4pm.
Artist in attendance.
Exhibition dates: December 2 – January 21, 2017.

 

“Test Pattern”, mixed media on linen, 160cm x 160cm.

 

8 November 2016 - 16:00, by , in Exhibitions & Fairs, Comments off

Solo booth with Brendan Tang at Art Toronto 2016, October 28-31.

4-0x_arttoronto

Gallery Jones gratefully acknowledges the support of the Canada Council for the Arts.

logo

10 October 2016 - 12:11, by , in Exhibitions & Fairs, Comments off
Opening reception: Saturday, October 15, 2-4pm.
Exhibition dates: October 14 – November 19, 2016.
“Untitled XVIII”, 2016, oil on canvas, 45″ x 90″.
Three principles shape my practice and each emphasizes the open-ended process of making paintings and texts: development by transformation (Stanley William Hayter); form is never more than an extension of content (Robert Creeley via Charles Olson); the medium is the message (Marshall McLuhan).
In the studio the search is for discovery through proprioception (sensibility within the organism by movement of its own tissue), that is, the intelligence of the body. In my practice it isn’t reason over passion, or passion over reason, but reason with passion. Not depiction of “the real” but re-enactment of the real through the proprioception of rimed experience, language, landscape and art.
– Pierre Coupey
Pierre Coupey’s work has received numerous awards, grants and commissions, including grants from the Conseil des Arts du Québec, the Canada Council, the British Columbia Arts Council, and the Audain Foundation for the Arts. In 2013 he received the Distinguished Artist Award from FANS.
His work has been exhibited in over 30 solo and 40 group shows nationally and internationally, and is represented in numerous private collections in Canada, the United States, Japan and Europe, and in corporate, university and public collections across Canada. Significant public collections include the Burnaby Art Gallery, the Canada Council Art Bank, the Kelowna Art Gallery, Simon Fraser University Art Gallery, University of Guelph Collection, the University of Lethbridge Art Gallery and the Vancouver Art Gallery.
1 October 2016 - 16:03, by , in Exhibitions & Fairs, Comments off

img_2114

 

 

Exhibition Dates: September 10 – October 11, 2016
Brendan Tang’s ceramic creations have been exhibited and collected widely. In the past few years his work has been exhibited at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Ariana Museum in Geneva, Musée Magnelli in Vallauris, France as well as in Shanghai, Limoges, Seattle, Kansas City, Reno, Toronto, Montréal to name just a few.  This exhibition at Gallery Jones brings together pieces from the Manga Ormolu series that have been garnering critical attention nationally and internationally, entirely new work from the studio and an exciting new series of suspended sculptures that play in the realm of pop cultural appropriation.
There is a catalogue that accompanies the exhibition and the following is an excerpt from the essay by Shaun Dacey, Curator at Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver:
For Tang, the initial impetus of the work emerges from the historical context of ormolu. The act of Europeans adding ormolu (gold and bronze gilt mounts) to Chinese made ceramics emerged in 18th century France after the explosion of Ming Dynasty ceramic imports in preceding centuries. Through the development of new techniques and experimentation in vessel shape and colour influenced by contact with Islam, Chinese ceramics emerged as a highly sought after luxury object in European aristocracy. Capitalizing on this, the industry shifted to focus on export to the west. Chinese ceramists began to produce compositions specifically for their western audience. European importers in turn began to adding ormolu to ‘westernize’ the vessels. These original mash-ups are a physical representation of the cross-cultural exchange at the time. They speak to the evolutionary nature of a globalized market, and a complex timeline of influence from Islam to China, and eventually Europe.
Responding to this early modern mash-up ormolu, Tang offers us a skilled slight of the hand. When one encounters these impossibly surreal objects, the spectacle is astounding. But, on closer inspection the magic trick is slowly exposed. The artist’s hand becomes made evident. Perfect copies, the two duelling forms are fantasy. Beyond this showmanship and baroque virtuosity, the series speaks to a transience. Tang’s connection of traditional and future forms rest in-between the malleability and friction of ethno-pop-cultural identity, an amalgam of western perceptions of ‘Asian-ness’. As apparent by its titling, Manga Ormolu is both hybrid and transitional, a very physical collision between compositional and stylistic tropes that evoke cultural stereotypes.

 

 

7 September 2016 - 14:07, by , in Exhibitions & Fairs, Comments off

JEFF DEPNER & RICHARD STORMS: UNFOLD, REBUILD

Opening reception: Saturday, May 28, 2-4pm.

Exhibition dates: May 28-June 25, 2016.

The paintings in this exhibition by Richard Storms and Jeff Depner reflect the built environment, expose the structure of a well articulated painting and wallow in the tactile nature of something hand-made.  The thick, kneaded surface of Depner’s smaller paintings stands in contrast and compliment to the staccato rhythms of Storms’ crisp canvases.  Both artists are concerned with breaking something down and building it up, with an aesthetic wholeness reached at some point between abstraction and function; Depner’s paintings tease at a useable geometry while Storms’ hint to a place and a familiar point of view. 

Richard Storms lives and works in Toronto, Ontario.  He holds a Master’s Degree in Fine Art from York University and has work in numerous private and public collections across the country, including The Art Gallery of Hamilton, The Musée d’Arte Contemporain in Montreal, the University of Toronto and the Royal Bank of Canada.

Jeff Depner lives and works in Vancouver, British Columbia.  Depner is also represented in New York City and Cologne, Germany, and has exhibited internationally at Scope Basel and New York, among other venues.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Richard Storms, “Financial District”, 2016, mixed media on canvas, 60″ x 84″.

ECHO_lr

Jeff Depner, “Echo”, 2016, mixed media on canvas, 22″ x 14.5″.

7 September 2016 - 13:58, by , in Exhibitions & Fairs, Comments off

GEORGE VERGETTE: ORPHISMIC

Opening reception: Saturday, April 30, 2-4pm.

Exhibition dates: April 30 – May 21, 2016.

Orphismic is a nw series of works combining multi-layered, sprayed acrylic with thick layers of impasto oil paint.  The titled of the show refers to a style coined by Guillaume Apollinaire to describe works which immerse the viewer in pure aesthetic pleasure while retaining a sense of structure and sublime meaning; however, this is where the relationship ends.

While Orphism defined images created entirely from the artist’s consciousness, the forms in Vergette’s paintings are culled from vintage T-shirt graphics.  The graphics have been partially recreated, but the original meaning has been lost and the viewer is left with the minimal form as a waymarker.

vergette_interior

Life’s Too Short Not To Be In Love, 2016

Oil and acrylic on canvas over panel

72″ x 48″

20 May 2016 - 12:12, by , in Exhibitions & Fairs, Comments off
TATA_17(final)
“Things As They Are #17″, archival inkjet print, 20″ x 16″, edition of 3.

Gallery Jones is pleased to present the first Canadian exhibition of work by Erin O’Keefe, who is based in New York City and New Brunswick, Canada. She received a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Cornell University and a Master’s of Architecture from Columbia University.

Artist Statement:

I am a photographer and an architect, and my work is informed by both of these disciplines. My background in architecture is the underpinning for my art practice, providing my first sustained exposure to the issues and questions that I contend with in my photographs. The questions that I ask through my work are about the nature of spatial perception, and the tools that I use are rooted in the abstract, formal language of making that I developed as an architect.  As a photographer, I am interested in the layer of distortion and misapprehension introduced by the camera as it translates three dimensional form and space into two dimensional image. This inevitable and often fruitful misalignment is the central issue in my work.

O’Keefe’s constructions, built from mundane objects such as painted plywood and tinted Plexiglas, are made to be photographed.  While there is implicitly a deconstruction of photography going on in these works that play at being paintings or even architectural definitions of space, what seems of paramount importance to the artist is the image; its qualities, textures and compositions.

Categories

Archives